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Jennifer Taylor, PhD, MPH

Associate Professor

Jennifer Taylor
Phone: 267.359.6060
College: School of Public Health
Program: Environmental and Occupational Health
Email: jat65@drexel.edu
CV: Download CV

Degrees

BS, Biochemistry, Albright College; MPH, Health Services, Boston University School of Public Health; PhD, Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Bio

Dr. Taylor has been trained in the field of injury prevention and control, and uses its principles to address safety issues in healthcare settings and in certain occupational groups.  

Within healthcare organizations, she investigates safety and quality issues in both patient and provider populations. Her research focuses on system design for patient safety surveillance and the association between organizational culture and injuries to patients and nurses.

In an effort to comprehensively study patient safety, Dr. Taylor’s research unites evidence from the fields of injury prevention and control, quality improvement, and occupational safety. She employs an integrated public health approach to these issues through the study of patients, healthcare workers, and the policy environment. As an epidemiologist, she asks, "Do the associations between organizational climate and nurse injury extend to patients?" As a policy analyst, she asks, "What non-punitive policy alternatives to quality improvement might be possible to address growing patient and provider patient safety concerns?" As an injury professional, she asks, "How will the United States conduct the surveillance of patient safety events so we can assure the public of accurate statistics?"

Over the last 6 years, Dr. Taylor has applied her surveillance and safety climate expertise to the U.S. fire service, investigating the relationship between its safety culture and injury risk. This has been a natural extension of her patient safety work as many of the factors that impact medical care are found in the fire service. Since 2007, she has served as the consultant epidemiologist to the International Association of Fire Chiefs' (IAFC) National Near-Miss Reporting System, a fascinating system through which firefighters report hazards they observe in their environment.

Dr. Taylor’s recent grant awards include two FEMA Assistance to Firefighter grants to develop (1)a model firefighter nonfatal injury surveillance system, and (2) a survey to assess safety climate and its relationship with firefighter injury.  She has a NIOSH RO3 grant to apply machine learning algorithms to narrative text data from the IAFC Near-Miss system.

Prior to her academic appointment, Dr. Taylor served 15 years of experience in state government, hospital quality management, and the basic sciences. She welcomes queries from, and extends mentoring to, students who are considering careers in these environments. Past positions include: the Chief of Health Statistics and Data Management for the State of New Hampshire, and Project Director of the CDC-funded program to establish emergency department data systems for injury surveillance at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

Research Interests

  • Machine learning
  • Health services management and outcomes research
  • Data linkage
  • Health policy - quality, safety, presumptive disability
  • Safety climate assessment (organizational culture)
  • Patient safety surveillance and policy
  • Data privacy
  • Injury prevention
  • Occupational health

Publications

Taylor, JA and Frey, LT.  “A Call to Collect Industry and Occupation Codes in Healthcare Data”.  Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health.  55(5) 495-499, May 2013.  DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e318293af12.

Taylor JA, Pandian R, Mao L, Michael, YL.  “Using inpatient hospital discharge data to monitor patient safety events.” Journal of Healthcare Risk Management. 2013;32(4) doi:  10.1002/jhrm.21107.

Roman LA, Guard A, and Taylor, JA.  “Examining the term “surveillance” as a potential barrier between public health and community partners”.  Injury Prevention. Published Online First: February 12, 2013 doi:10.1136/injuryprev-2012-040713.

Taylor, JA, Dominici, F, Sexton, JB, Agnew, JA, Morlock, L, Miller, MR. “Do Nurse and Patient Injuries Share Common Antecedents? An Analysis of Associations with Safety Climate and Working Conditions.” BMJ Qual Saf2012;21:101-111 doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2011-000082   

Taylor, JA, Gerwin, DJ, Morlock, L, Miller, MR. Triangulating case-finding tools for patient safety surveillance: a cross-sectional case study of puncture/laceration. InjPrev 2011;Published Online First: 5 May 2011 doi:10.1136/ip.2010.029108   

“The History and Impact of Disability Law for Firefighters,” Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on the History of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of California San Francisco, June 22, 2010, San Francisco, California, Paul Blanc, M.D. and Brian Dolan, M.D., eds., UC Medical Humanities Consortium, Perspectives in Medical Humanities Series, found at http://medicalhumanities.ucsf.edu/book-series.html, publication forthcoming.